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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 111 (some duplicates have been removed)
to say the agreements with israel regarding the easing of the blockade and with egypt, are very vague. they're being negotiated today. i mean they're an agreement to, to negotiate things about them. which are continuing today in cairo. they may be temporary, they may be very, very limited, and they may never materialize at all what hamas has gained is first of all a certain diplomatic breakthrough. the amir of qatar went there before this happened. while it was going on, the prime minister of egypt went there the foreign minister of durky and foreign minister of tunisia went there. the prime minister of turkey may go. what hamas has been able to do is bring -- >> break out of its diplomatic cage a little bit. that's the benefit. the other thing is that this is a benefit to the people, the hamas factions in gaza who are fighting an internal power struggle with the external leadership that used to be based in damascus and is now disbursed all over the world. i think for different factions in hamas they've achieved things politically for themselves. the people of gaza may be in a sense o
diplomat i canic talks continue in egypt, israel's leaders are preparing to take what they call operation pillar and defense. theyprominent netanyahuprime minister netanyahu and his cabinet deciding what to do. they said if israel was going to invade gaza, they would have done so already. after israel killed hamas' military commander in airstrike three israeli civilians have been killed and 70 wounded missile strikes that reached as far as tel aviv, 50 miles from gaza's northern border. but israel's iron dome defense system has knocked down hundreds of palestinian missiles, limiting casualties and damage. they have launched 1300 airstrikes against targets in gaza. 106 palestinians have been killed in the fighting. hospital officials say half of those killed were civilians. however, israeli officials say they believe the majority of those killed were militants for hamas or one of the associated palestinian terror groups. in bangkok thailand, president obama said sunday the u.s. while working to de-escalate the situation and end the fighting would stand behind its ally. >> we're fully suppo
, thank you. >> gregg: contest in the background on egypt's president morsi. he was elected in june of this year after a revolution overthrowing president hosni mubarak. he is head 6 muslim brotherhood. he is the first freely elected president and first islamist to be head of an arab state. they accuse him of trying to monopolize powers, the courts and media and parliament and in the end, sharia law, imposing strict islamic principles. >> heather: it raises new questions coming one day after egypt help broker a cease-fire in the gaza strip. former u.s. ambassador to the u.n. john bolton joined us earlier to weigh in saying it's no coincidence. >> he didn't wait but one day before moving here. so whether he had a wink and a nod from president obama or whether whether he felt emboldened in the wake of the cease-fire to believe the u.s. would not criticize him or do anything major to stop this power grab, i think we'll have to find out in the next few days. the timing is not coincidental. you can bet on that. >> heather: coming up the latest reaction from the white house to the turmoil
by population? it turns out it's not at all a close call. it's egypt, by a lot. more than one in five people in the middle east is egyptian. it's not the richest country, it's not geographically in the middle, but it is the center of gravity for both population and the politics of that whole blessed region. geographically, more toward the middle of the whole middle east is the nation of israel, comparatively tiny. if you want to understand where the fighting is centered, you have to zoom in even further to a whole different scale to even be able to see what the relevant border is over which this fighting is happening. looking at it in that context, you might ask, what's that giant border right next to this relativity tiny place being fought over? that's egypt. that's the egyptian border right up next to this tiny strip of land where the fighting is happening in gaza. that's why part of why this was such a big deal. egypt and israel shaking hands. thank you jimmy carter. the peace treaty between this important country, the nation of israel. but jimmy carter, it turns out, is not only the only
but while preparing israeli troops are gathering on the border. even as egypt works to broker a deal, former british prime minister tony blair traveled to tel aviv to sit down with israeli president perez. >> i hope that over the coming days we can achieve cessation on a basis that is sustainable. >> and joining me now from gaza, nbc news foreign correspondent ayman. what's the latest on what's happening in cairo? >> good afternoon, tamron. well egyptian officials have met with the leaders of the two major palestinian factions engaged in this military operation with israel. they're trying to get them to commit to a cessation of hostility force a period of 48 hours to allow for a longer truce to go into effect. the palestinians feel they have the upper hand here, and they are saying they will not stop their attacks into southern israel so long as israel maintains a siege on gaza. they want it lifted and they want guaranteed backed by the international community that israel will no longer engage and target and kill senior leaders of the palestinian factions here in gaza. they wa
jazeera reporting that the ceasefire is going to be announced this evening in cairo. now egypt will reportedly be agreeing to oversee this plan which is said to include an easing of the crossroads into gaza. so peace appears to be eminent but what do you make of the transparency of what the outline of it deal is? >> well, i think we still need to see it implemented. having spent a lot of time in the middle east, done a lot of negotiations, one thing i know about this part of the world, nothing is concluded until you actually see it carried out. it's one thing to talk about it. it's something else to do it. so let's actually see the ceasefire take hold. what i'm hearing is that by midnight their time, which would be around 5:00 our time, that's when it might actually take hold. so if it does, that will be the first step. then the question will be how real is it, number one. number two, what are its real elements? if there is some easing of movement into gaza, what are the commitments that hamas is undertaking to ensure there will not only be no fire out of gaza but also is there
, tunisia and egypt. the u.s. institute of peace post this to our discussion. >> good morning, everyone. i am steven heydemann, middle east initiative at the u.s. institute of peace and we are delighted to see you all here at today's session on security sector reform in the arab world. i think some of those who rsvp may have been scared away by the false rumor that you would be subjected to a political polling experience following the panel. that's not the case that you don't need to worry about that. were very pleased to have you out here with this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important, but also especially urgent. i don't think that it is an exaggeration to say that what happens with the security sectors in the arab world over the coming year or so, and by security service, i mean the police, the armed forces and most of all of course the very substantial intelligence apparatus is that exist in every arab country, that what happens with those sectors of the bureaucracy in the arab world will let her sleep determined the fate of
for example in egypt the brotherhood may be very reluctant on certain aspects of the security sector they're dealing with the military privileges of the military but other areas, for example, police, basic police reform and abuses and behavior of police i think my question and the brotherhood would be happy to see this corrected and improved, but that there is a perception within the brotherhood by many in the egyptian government institutions that if you were to address these issues it would result in its short term increase in crime and stability and they feel as though they can either fight crime effectively where they could address these kind of concerns which would be useful in the long term but detrimental in the short term and they would pay a heavy political price for the increase in crime on the basic security that would come with this reform. if you talk a little bit about that and also in tunisia i was there a couple of weeks ago, and one of the topics that came up quite a bit was the attacks on the u.s. embassy and while those of us here that might obviously highlight the need
from egypt. thousands of protesters gathered in tahrir square. 6:15 at night there, many have been chanting step down in reaction to the decree issue by egypt's new president that grants him absolute power. the sixth straight day of protest after morsi issued his decree last thursday. earlier today, the protest turning violent on a street near tahrir square. at least three protesters have been killed since the weekend. nbc live from cairo. and the crowd in tahrir square has been growing, building over the past hours. explain what we're seeing now. >> reporter: well, behind me, probably tens of thousands of egyptians have gathered, been here since the early hours of the morning. in fact, some have been camped out for the past six days. many songs, chants, slogans reminiscent of two years ago, calling on the same things they did two years ago, which is for the president of egypt to step down. they've changed the name, obviously, to reflect egypt's new islamist president. you mentioned that incident today with the tear gas and the police, that took place outside the u.s. embassy. riot
a plea to allies of the palestinians in particular. the president of egypt, the prime minister of turkey said if you would like to see a two-state solution in the near future, a palestinian state next to israel this has to deescalate now. the president expressing this fear if hamas doesn't stop rocket attacks on to israel's soille he fears left unsaid is israel may retaliate and turn in to a ground war and then the idea of a two-state solution in the peace process will be in the way distant future. obviously the middle east peace process has been on hold for quite sometime. he was asked about this trip will include a visit to myanmar which is also known as burma. he was asked whether it was too soon. a lot of human rights violations taken in burma and he wouldn't have gone if aung san suu kyi didn't think it was right for him to go. a few notes to point out. one is during -- before the press conference he and secretary clinton were visiting a mondastermonastery. they were joking about getting prayers over the fiscal cliff. the president at the press conference was asked what about what k
and jerusalem, they're being funneled through the sudan to egypt, to gaza, to hamas. they're coming right through the sudan, and the sudan is up to their eyeballs. you've got president morsi who has been very chum my with the president of sudan. they're very tight now and the plot thickens. >> this idea that morsi of the muslim brotherhood is somehow a moderate when it comes to dealing with israel is just fanciful. the threat here is that if israel backs off from its present posture with respect to gaza, more missiles will come in from iran through sudan, and when and if israel decides to do something about the iranian nuclear weapons program, the israeli air force will be in a very difficult position because it can't be in three places at once. it can't be over iran and over gaza and over the valley trying to take out hezbollah missiles. >> of course, it was over sudan taking out the munitions factory that they believe was in iran less than a month ago. they can't be that place, either. >> right. no. i think this is a decision iran has made to demonstrate what many people have feared for
into israel and firing back on twitter, warning israel has "opened the gates of hell" on itself. egypt has recalled its ambassador to israel. in the meantime, the u.s. state department condemned the strikes fired from gaza and supporting israel's right to defend itself. i talked about all of this with sara sidner and also david kirkpatrick of the new york times and cnn's fareed zakaria. what is the latest on the attacks and the failout? >> what we are seeing are more rockets coming into israel. there have been dozens of air strikes as well since the killing of ahmed al jabari, the leader of hamas' military wing, but he is also one of the founders of hamas. we are talking about a huge blow to hamas, and now the government there in gaza. israel is also telling us, and we are just hearing this from the military spokesperson that they are bringing in reservists, but they are consider iing a ground war, but they have not yet given the go ahead for that, but they are preparing. we know that they have been firing with the air with the air strikes, but we also know that they have been firing from
in the days ahead. president obama also spoke last night with egypt president mohamed morsi about working together to preserve peace and security in the region. tension between israel and egypt's new islamist government has increased since the attacks with egypt recalling its ambassador to israel in protest. richard haass, also an emergency meeting of the u.n. security council last night. sift through this for us. how big is this? how significant is this in the middle east right now? >> well, it's big for lots of reasons, because it's not happening in isolation. one is you have the largest military clashes between israel and hamas in, what, four year now, and it's not going to stop. at times it doesn't matter in the middle east exactly why things begin. over the last few months there have been hundreds of rocket attacks, now this, then retaliation. it just happens. second of all, it's happening in the absence of anything political. there's no dialogue going on whatsoever between israelis and palestinians. this can't substitute for this. thirdly, egyptians withdrew their ambassador. since
and it's the ultimate nn trying to declare the judiciary in egypt basically null and void. >> yeah, look, morsi came out last week looking rather good, like a statesman and he helped organization the cease-fire and reined hamas in and took responsibility and moved immediately from that to give himself dictatorial powers. if those dictatorial powers are taken by him the arab spring is pretty much over and democratization is pretty much over. i'men couraged to see how many people come into the streets and they don't want to trade mubarak to the theocracy that morsi and the brotherhood are proposing. i'm not sure at that morsi is going to give up that easily. >> alisyn: thank you for your insight. good to see you. up next it's a state in debt. why is illinois spending for cable for prisoners and on pig races. and a man gets through security with a woman's boarding pass? how was that done and is anything being done about it. ♪ ♪ ♪ hurry in this saturday and sunday for great deals. likehe lucid by lg, free. or the galaxy nexus by samsung, free. this weekend, get the best deals on the be
's targeting 100 sites across gaza. i know, youf heard this all before. this time it's different. because egypt is not happy with with israel. it's already reached out to president obama and told him, we must put an end to this aggression. sarah seidner is in the region and has the latest for us this morning. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, carol. yes, the number of those who have been killed during this escalation, fighting between gaza and israels had now risen. three people in israel inside an apartment building killed from a rocket attack sent from gaza, from hamas, the government here. we're now learning that 15 people have been killed here in total today, here in gaza, including nine militants, several children and a pregnant woman. what's happening now is off and on, we are hearing air strikes. again and again across the city, across gaza city and along the gaza strip. we know that there have been more than 196 rockets now that have entered into israel from gaza. we were there this morning when we saw ourselves 15 rockets coming in. some of those rockets being knocked down by th
a lot right now, and that is egypt that's taking a very firm stance, calling this an israeli aggression. but one of the interesting things that tony blair, the former british prime minister said, he said of course, right now everybody is on the phone, everybody is trying to negotiate, everybody is trying to bring the violence to an end. but at this point in time it certainly looks very much as though things are escalating rather than deescalating and that is certainly the message that we are getting from the israeli defense forces. >> fred pleitgen, thank you very much indeed. >>> joining me is the israeli ambassador to the u.n. welcome to you, sir. >> thank you. good evening. >> this is a dangerous situation, isn't it. what is your reading of what is happening on the ground? we're hearing tonight of 2,000 troops being moved, israeli troops, maybe 30,000 others being brought up as well. what are you hearing and what is the plan? >> well, i won't get into military operations but it has to be very, very clear. israel and israel's government will do anything it takes to protect its citizen
, united states giving a bunch of money to egypt but did it take the money and run and turn its back on the united states? >> gretchen: there is a bomb shell. key evidence in the casey anthony trial may have been over looked whompt the heck was the prosecutor. and the bomb shell to convince the jury to convict her and didn't. >> brian: they didn't check firefox. [ mother ] you can't leave the table till you finish your vegetables. [ clock ticking ] [ male announcer ] there's a better way... v8 v-fusion. vegetable nutrition they need, fruit taste they love. could've had a v8. or...try kids boxes! this monday online only. get the droid razr by motorola in cranberry, free. or a white 7-inch samsung gaxy tab 2, just $99.99. this holiday, get the best deals on the best devices on the best network. exclusively at verizon. with thermacare heatwraps. thermacare works differently. it's the only wrap with patented heat cells that penetrate deep to relax, soothe, and unlock tight muscles. for up to 16 hours of relief, try thermacare. without freshly-made pasta. you could also cut corners by mak
the fiscal cliff. >>> developing now, new clashes in cairo, egypt today, between protesters and police. the protesters have been demanding that egypt's new president rescind the decree he had last thursday granting him absolute power. tens of thousands of protesters rallied in caikacairo's tahrir square. two of e jim's top courts today suspended their work in protest of president mohamed morsi's decr decree. joining me to talk more about the middle east is ambassador dennis ross, an expert on the region. he was the chief middle east negotiate for president clinton and president bush and served as a special adviser for president obama. he is a mideast analyst. both supporters and opponents are planning more giant protests on friday as well as sad. what's your assessment of the situation and the back and forth between the two sides? >> well, i think what we're seeing is is that this is a new egypt. anybody who thought that president morsi could come in and act like president mubarak and could rule as opposed to govern, there's no doubt that's not the case. there's no doubt he miscalculat
that egypt's prime minister plans to visit gaza, gaza, that is, tomorrow. now, don't forget a peace agreement that keeps israel and egypt on good terms. there were real questions about whether that was going to be honored by the new muslim brotherhood president of egypt, and now we find out that this egyptian leader is going to go visit gaza in the midst of rising, escalating tensions between gaza and the israelis. now we want to get back to re land visit earth who is live near the israel/gaza border. so basically, leland, the rockets kept showering into israel, somebody, the head of hamas -- they call him hamas' osama bin laden, basically, took credit for the bloodshed being unleashed in israel. and israel bombed that guy, killed that guy, and now it seems to be escalating from there. >> reporter: exactly, megyn. his assassination happened yesterday around 4 p.m., and hamas came out and said israel has declared war and, quote, opened the gates of hell. and those kinds of words are not things that are thrown around lightly all over the middle east. and definitely as we saw it today, hamas liv
, between israel and the palestinians, since egypt's leadership has changed. and we know that egypt has a different reaction to this than they did under president morsi than they had in the past under former president mubarak? >> reporter: absolutely. on a few different fronts. one, the leadership here, it's currently aligned with the one that runs egypt. and president morsi comes from that. and the more important one, for the past several days they've been trying to mediate between the palestinian faction in israel. they reached a truce, but that truce didn't hold for long. more importantly, israel is trying to resume a bit of a leadership role. yesterday, they lobbied to secure the security council. and also they convened with the arab league to try to put an end to the barrage of fire. some for its part are calling on egypt to sever ties with israel. that would be a major setback for the united states because the israeli/egyptian peace treaty has been a cornerstone of u.s. policy in the middle east. >> ayman, we'll be checking in with you all day, i imagine. thanks very much. >>> mov
. i find his role in all of this fascinating. i mean here, taking over egypt after the arab spring, an ally whether we approved of what he, did he was an ally for so long. coming out of the accords. does egypt see its role as a peacemaker. does it gain currency by being that? >> i think from the american perspective, egypt is a necessary broker. they consider hamas a terrorist entity and so the u.s. does not directly deal with hamas. in order to be a broker between both sides the u.s. necessarily needs to deal with egypt. >> yeah. you know, john mccain, we see hillary clinton there. john mccain had another opinion about who he thinks should be over in the middle east talking to these people. here's john mccain. >> find someone even as high ranking frankly as former president bill clinton. to go and be the negotiator. i know he would hate me for saying that but we need a person of enormous prestige and influence to have these parties sit down together as an honest broker. >> you know, when we hear mccain s
our audience up to date on that. >>> coming up, egypt's president morsi not giving in despite another day of protests over the decree that giving him near absolute power. >>> but first, a lot going on today and here's things to know. president obama's second inauguration will have an asterisk next to it. it will be the seventh time ever that the constitutionally mandated date for a president's swearing in, january 20th, has fallen on a sunday. so, following tradition, the inauguration will be moved to monday, january 21st. house speaker boehner announced who will chair the 19 major house committees in the next congress and it turns out they have something in common besides party affiliation. they're all men, white men. but there are two committee charls that have not been filled yet so a woman could possibly end up in one of those seats. >>> meantime, some republican house members will attend a special screening of "lincoln" happening tomorrow. house majority whip mccarthy rented a theater for the event. president obama hosted a screening at the white house. those are the things we th
of peace looking at the state of security forces in egypt, tunisia and libya. the arab spring are in the state of transition with the army, police and intelligence services playing different roles in each. this took place earlier this week in washington. it's two hours. >> good morning everyone. i'm steve heydemann for issues of the u.s. institute of peace, and we are delighted to see you all here at today's session on the securities sector reform in the arab world and some rsvp to me have been scared by the false rumor that it would be subjected to a political polling experience following the panel. that is not the case. so you do not need to worry about that. we are very pleased to have you here with us all this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important but also especially urgent. i do not think that it is an exaggeration to say what happens with the security sectors in the arab world and by security sectors i mean the police, the armed forces, and most of all of course the very substantial intelligence apparatus that
with us. who was the strongest player in that whole period? it was egypt. egypt was strong because egypt has peace with israel. the way to be strong is not by making war and unilateral declarations in the u.n. that have no meaning. the way to gain strength is to be a partner. >> is the cease-fire holding? >> cease-fire's holding so far. >> and you thank egypt's president mohamed morsi for that? >> he is so far now proving to be a constructive partner certainly as proven in this last operation. >> is he honoring the peace treaty with israel? >> i think there's peace between egypt and israel on a daily basis, yes. >> what about syria? what would you like to see the government of israel as far as syria is concerned? because it's intense what's going on right now. about 40,000 people have been killed over the past year and a half. >> it's horrible. it's a terrible tragedy. we, the people of israel, look at the people of syria with great respect, even awe standing up and risking and even giving their lives for freedom from the terrible bashar al assad regime. we want them to go. we've long wa
over egypt after the arab spring. mubarak was an ally to the country for so long, coming out of the camp david accords where sedatesadat was. >> i think from the american perspective egypt is a necessary broker. they consider hamas a terrorist entity. the u.s. does not directly deal with hamas. in order to be a broker between both sides the u.s. necessarily needs to deal with egypt. >> yes well, you know, john mccain we see hillary clinton there. john mccain had another opinion who he thinks should be over in the mideast talking to these people. >> even someone as high ranking frankly as former president bill clinton to go and be the negotiator. i know he would hate me for saying that, but we need someone of enormous prestige and influence to sit down with the parties together and work as a broker. >> when we see mccain saying something nice about a democrat, he has to go and say one more thing. this is john mccain once again. >> if this god-forbid violence escalates, if someone was there brokering the process and bringing a halt to it. now the president makes phone callscall
the situation will get worse before it gets better. one thing nbc has confirmed is egypt's prime minister will make an unprecedented visit to the gaza strip on friday. he's leading a high delegation of cabinet officials to mediate and perhaps broker a truce between the israelis and palestinians but more importantly to express solidarity with the people of gaza who he says are now subject to israeli aggression. >> let me bring in nbc's martin fletcher in tel aviv. martin, senior u.s. officials told nbc news to expect more from israel later today. can you add to that information? >> reporter: well, yeah, the israelis are making it as clear as they possibly can they will do anything it takes to stop the palestinian attacks on israel and to make the southern cities of israel secure. the defense minister said today and he emphasized this, and we will do anything, and i repeat anything to keep those cities secure. the israelis are emphasizing repeatedly from different sources they'll do whatever it takes. when the americans warn that israel will do more this evening, they're echoing what the is
-fire or a truce. they tried doing that a day ago using egypt as the intermediary, that fell through. now egypt has taken its ambassador out of israel, so who will do the mediation and who will try to get in between these two warring factions and try to get them to come together to stop this is going to be a real difficult, a real problem, i think, for the time being. but israel is saying, look, if you keep send rockets into our country, we are going to respond and we are going to respond with force. >> sara sidner inside gaza. >> wondering about that response inside the neighboring country. >>> coming up, how the president will pay personal attentions to the victims of sandy, just hours from now. [ boys screaming ] hi, i just switched jobs, and i want to roll over my old 401(k) into a fidelity ira. man: okay, no problem. it's easy to get started; i can help you with the paperwork. um...this green line just appeared on my floor. yeah, that's fidelity helping you reach your financial goals. could you hold on a second? it's your money. roll over your old 401(k) into a fidelity ira and take control of
rockets in any other way. of course there is some diplomatic activity going on, too, in egypt in particular, trying to organize a truce. only a 48-hour truce between israel and hamas. so there's a positive moves ahead going on trying to end this diplomatically. but not everybody is betting on that right now, alex. >> sounds like all the pieces are on the chess board for sure. thank you very much, martin fletcher. >> let's get some perspective on this crisis. joining me is military analyst general mccaffrey. is there a danger this could turn into a larger middle east war? >> no question. i think we're one step shorter of an all out ground operation in the gaza. i don't see how the israelis could top rate continued threat to huge parts of the civilian population. and then in the background, of course, we have the iranians and hezbollah on the lebanese southern border. the israelis are quite vulnerable to these rocket strikes. fit went to all-out war there would be significant israeli losses. >> all right, general, would the u.s. get involved militarily if this does escalate? >>
. >> and there is the concern of how egypt will react. what is the word there on how they are reacting? >> well, we already heard from egypt's president and the foreign minister. they have condemned the emergency meeting in the arab league to explore popular options. egypt says it will open the border with gaza to completely allow all wounded and injured and anybody else who wants to get out. we are getting initial reports that the prime minister may be leading a high delegation visit tomorrow. that would be unprecedented given the security situation here. >> a ayman, thank you so much. appreciate it. from the middle east to back home. let's take a look at what is happening this hour. the president will land in new york city within the next 30 minutes, where he will tour the damage done by superstorm sandy. he will be greeted by andrew cuomo and governor bloomberg. and there are two closed door meetings on the deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. one is taking place with the house intelligence committee and the the other with the house foreign affairs committee. there are new developments on th
in egypt. is this conflict about to become something much more profound, prolonged, and serious? >> reporter: well, it certainly has the potential to, and it's important to emphasize really this chapter in a prolonged conflict between israel and the palestinians certainly has entered into a new dimension when it comes to the gaza strip. this isn't the first time they have exchanged this type of gunfire. in fact, we saw four years ago the operation that was unfolded, very reminiscent of what we're seeing now. that's the concern many palestinians have here. 1.5 million people in gaza bracing themselves for more violence. the concern is whether israel will launch a ground offensive. there is precedence for it. that's why many palestinians are fearful that in the coming days this can only get worse. a lot of people are questioning the effects of all of this. why is israel continuing to carry out these attacks if it has not been able to stop the rocket fire it set out to stop. when it launched the operation four years ago, it was precisely the same modus operandi for the same objecti
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 111 (some duplicates have been removed)

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